delete

Willem Blaeu. “India quae Orientalis dicitur, et Insulae Adiacentes.” Amsterdam: W. & J. Blaeu, 1640-43

Image

Willem Blaeu. “India quae Orientalis dicitur, et Insulae Adiacentes.” Amsterdam: W. & J. Blaeu, 1640-43. 16 x 19 3/4. Engraving. Lovely, original hand color. Very good condition. Latin text on verso.

A striking map of India from a series of wonderfully decorative maps by Willem (Guilielmus) Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638), the progenitor of the famous Blaeu cartographic firm of Amsterdam. Blaeu studied astronomy and sciences with Tycho Brahe, and in 1599 established a globe and instrument making business which soon expanded to include cartographic and geographic publishing. This firm was to go on to become the largest and most important cartographic publishing firms in the world, run by his sons Cornelis (until his death in 1642) and Joan. The maps issued by the Blaeu firm are known for their fine craftsmanship and design, and have been called “the highest expression of Dutch cartographical art.” This map, with its excellent original color and clear and precise detail is a premier example of the Blaeu output.

I do have a Bleau map, but not this one. This looks pretty interesting

delete

Dutch map of South East Asia 1635

Hondius

I can’t believe I don’t have this map. I think I bid on it at one of the map auctions, but didn’t win.

It is a gorgeous and important map.

An important Dutch map of South East Asia, noteworthy for being the first map to include, albeit incompletely, the discoveries made by the Dutch vessel Duyfken in 1605-06 in the Gulf of Carpentaria, an expedition which made the first recorded European contacts with Australia. The Australian discoveries of the voyage are not recorded here, only the survey along the coast of New Guinea. The map includes South East Asia in general with all of Malaysia, the East Indies, the Philippines, Indonesia, Indochina and southern China with the Pearl River Delta, Taiwan, and part of Japan. Richly embellished with 3 cartouches, coats of arms, 2 compass roses, a sea monster and 6 sailing vessels.

Tags

delete

Beautiful map of Surat. Gujarat and Tappi river from 1781

Image

 

Image

I have the map on the top, it is kind of non-descript, I know. But I know the city of Surat and sort of felt attracted to it.

The bottom map, is kind of nice. I like maps of these types, where it seems that they captured each tree on the property. It is not accurate description of vegetation on the land, but it not completely random either.

Click on the bottom map to see it in its full glory.

‘Grondtekening van eenen Tuin te Suratte/ Ligging der Suratte aan den vloed Tappi’

Description: Antique map (later hand coloring) of Surat, situated at the river of Tappi in India from Carsten Niebuhr’s Voyage en Arabie & en d’ autres Pays circonvoisins …’, 1781. The right part shows a garden near Surat. Size: The overall size is 14 x 10,5 inch. The image size is 11,5 x 8 inch. Technic: copper engraving. Condition: Very Good; small wrinkle.

 

Tags

delete

Mercator Map 1595 – srilanka connected to main land

Image

I love this map, mainly because it shows modern day SriLanka but it is connected to the mainland of India. In most of the other maps of this era, Sri Lanka was generally depicted as a HUGE island.

The color on this is kind of strong and vivid and I think it is original color.

striking old color example of Mercator’s Ptolemaic map of ancient Southeast Asia, first issued in the 1595 edition of Mercator’s Geographia, based upon the works of Claudius Ptolemy.

While perhaps most famous for his maps of the modern World and the first to use the name “Atlas” to describe a book of maps, one of Mercator’s life works was a corrected and improved edition of maps based upon the work of Claudius Ptolemy.

The map shows the entire region of southeast Asia with the Ganges River in the west, the “Sinae” (China) in the east, and southeast Asia, the Indian Ocean, and China Sea.

Tags

delete

Linschoten map of India from 1596

Linschoten

This is a significant map. Mainly because it was leaps and bounds ahead of the other maps of India from that time-frame. There is incredible detail, names of the city are mostly correct, their placement is right and the soundings are pretty accurate as well.

Another reason why this map of special interest to me is because Linschoten acquired all of his information while serving as the secretary to Portuguese archbishop in Goa from 1583-1589.

Of particular value were the sailing guides he obtained that not only provided the best sailing routes to the East Indies and its lucrative spice trade but also showed the way from port to port once there.

Upon his return to the Netherlands, Linschoten published these documents with accompanying maps and his own descriptions of the area in his monumental Itinerario. Few books have had greater influence on historical events.

Linschoten’s maps are styled after Portuguese portolan charts of the 16th Century, upon which the map is based. Even in printed form, these maps retain the lush decorative flourishes of their sources.

I remember bidding on this map a while ago. But it was the darn euro-dollar conversion that made my bid kind of low. Expectation was that Euro would be about one US $, but at that time it was 1.6 or higher.

Any way, I have this map in my peripharal vision. I would have preferred it it was map of just India and not all of middle east, but because of the significance of this map, I’d like to get it.

Jan Huygen Van Linschoten: Deliniantur in hac tabula, Orae maritimae Abexiae, freti Mecani: al. Maris Rubri: Arabiae Freti Mecani: al Maris Rubri: Arabiae, Ormi, Persiae, Supra Sindam usque . . .

 

 

 

Title: Deliniantur in hac tabula, Orae maritimae Abexiae, freti Mecani: al. Maris Rubri: Arabiae Freti Mecani: al Maris Rubri: Arabiae, Ormi, Persiae, Supra Sindam usque . . .

Map Maker: Jan Huygen Van Linschoten

Place / Date: Amsterdam / 1596

Coloring: Hand Colored

Size: 20.5 x 15 inches

Condition: VG

Here is the map in its full glory. Click to embiggen.

Linschoten_full_map

Tags

delete

Cambaye Orissa Delli Decan.- 16th century

Image

I’d love to read and decipher the latin text description here. Interesting how one of the important cities from that time is Cambaye! I think the glory of Cambey, khambhat is under appreciated.

Title: [16th Century woodblock map of India] Cambaye Orissa Delli Decan.
Author: HONTER, Johannes.
Description: Published in Honter’s ‘CosmographiƦ rudimentis’, the map is surrounded by a Latin text description.
Dimensions: Woodcut, printed area 120 x 155, set in text.
Technique: Woodcut,

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Tags