delete

Narsinga et Ceylon – map of Shrilanaka from 1609

ceylon_shrilanka_1609

This is a miniature map, and I find it kind of hard to get excited about a miniature maps. But it is an interesting map for sure. It shows way too many islands on the coast line. I’ll keep an eye out for this one.

Amsterdam, c.1609. 90 x 125.
Uncoloured; A fine miniature map of Southern India and Ceylon, possibly engraved by Petrus Kaerius and probably published in the ‘Map Treasury’. Latin text on verso.

delete

SDUK 1877 – large map of India in 13 map set

sduk_large map

Engraved by J & C Walker, for the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. The index map of the whole of India and Ceylon, shows the extent of the 12 sheets and the areas covered.

I have this at least two or three of these sets that I can remember. One is a ten map set and another one is the one shown above 13 map set.

Not my fav maps for sure. It was more like a collections of names rather than maps. I generally bought them because they would have names of some of the citites that I know.

An individual map might look like this:

bengal_sduk

A lot of detail, but no soul!

SDUK did print maps of the city plans and those are intersting. I do have one of Calcutta published by SDUK.

The more interesting part is the publisher – The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, founded in 1826, was a Whiggish London organisation that published inexpensive texts intended to adapt scientific and similarly high-minded material for the rapidly expanding reading public. It was established mainly at the instigation of Lord Brougham with the objects of publishing information to people who were unable to obtain formal teaching, or who preferred self-education. The Society was sometimes mentioned in contemporary sources as SDUK.

delete

Willem Blaeu. “India quae Orientalis dicitur, et Insulae Adiacentes.” Amsterdam: W. & J. Blaeu, 1640-43

Image

Willem Blaeu. “India quae Orientalis dicitur, et Insulae Adiacentes.” Amsterdam: W. & J. Blaeu, 1640-43. 16 x 19 3/4. Engraving. Lovely, original hand color. Very good condition. Latin text on verso.

A striking map of India from a series of wonderfully decorative maps by Willem (Guilielmus) Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638), the progenitor of the famous Blaeu cartographic firm of Amsterdam. Blaeu studied astronomy and sciences with Tycho Brahe, and in 1599 established a globe and instrument making business which soon expanded to include cartographic and geographic publishing. This firm was to go on to become the largest and most important cartographic publishing firms in the world, run by his sons Cornelis (until his death in 1642) and Joan. The maps issued by the Blaeu firm are known for their fine craftsmanship and design, and have been called “the highest expression of Dutch cartographical art.” This map, with its excellent original color and clear and precise detail is a premier example of the Blaeu output.

I do have a Bleau map, but not this one. This looks pretty interesting

delete

SDUK. “Calcutta.” A very detailed map of Kolkata from 1842 – First Edition

sduk_calcutta

I think I have at least 3 copies of this. The first one doesn’t have any scenes, second one is in good shape, but very green and non-descript and third one (which is the First Edition of this map) has some detailed scenes that are really delightful – not because they show beautiful public buildings, but because they show images of people from Calcutta at that time and how they fit in to the British Raj.

A detailed and precisely drawn map of Calcutta by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK). This wonderful English enterprise was devoted to the spreading of up-to-date information and the enhancing of understanding. The Society is noted for their excellent maps, in particular their series of city maps of all parts of the world. These maps show most streets and major buildings. This map of Calcutta is typical of the Society’s output, with clear presentation of much detail of the city. Fort William and the Esplanade are prominent in the east, with the maze of streets of the city proper shown bounded by the “New Circular Canal.” A key identifies public buildings and churches. Along the bottom are three vignettes, showing the Writers Building, the Government House, and the Esplanade Row. A fine map of the city from near the middle of the nineteenth century.

Image

Image

calcutta_1843

calcutta_street_1842

public_building_calcutta_1842

[First edition.] Fine, original, steel-engraved plan of Calcutta, by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK), published as part of the Society’s Atlas in 1844, in London, by Chapman and Hall. The SDUK began its map publishing project under the leadership of Captain Francis Beaufort R.N. in 1829, and published the maps in parts, haltingly, over the next 15 years, completing the series in 1844, finally permitting the publication of a whole atlas. Many of the maps were actually drawn by Beaufort, who at the time was the Hydrographer to the Royal Navy, and all were closely supervised by him. J. & C. Walker worked closely with Beaufort in engraving the maps. The idea for the town plans, of which the SDUK published many dozens, was that of W. B. Clarke, an architect, who became an enthusiastic advocate for the plans, and who executed most of them himself, often on the basis of personal on-site observations. The plans are highly decorative, and often have accompanying vignettes, or sketches of the main buildings. Finely engraved, the plans set a standard of excellence for commercial map-makers in England for decades to come. Dimensions 16 1/4″ x 13 1/2″ overall. Excellent condition. High bidder pays 9.00 shipping and handling.

delete

Tallis Map 1850 London

tallis_map_india

It took me a while to find this map. Just absolutely beautiful. I love it!

The seal of East India Company is kind of strange, but it is a great map to have.

J. TALLIS “Southern India Including the Presidencies of Bombay and Madras.” London. c.1850. Colored. 13X9. Attractive and very detailed map shows the mainland of India and the island of Ceylon. Region covered stretches from present day Pakistan and Afganistan called Sinde and Gujer showing the Gulf of Cutch and the Gulf of Cambay. Locates Karachee (Karachi) and Bombay on the coasts. In the northeast map stretches across India to Gangam, Jaggurnant and the Bay of Bengal. Includes 7 decorative engraved scenes of 1.) Shuhur, Jeypoor, 2.) Tomb of Sultan Mahomed Shah. Beja poor. 3.) The Government House, Calcutta, 4.) Seal of the East India Company, 5.) English soldiers writing on a monument, 6.) Religious statues, 7.) Armies galloping on horses and camels. Includes a decorative border frame and an elaborate title cartouche.

delete

Railway map of India from 1893

1893_railwaymaps

You have to click on this map and see how extensive the railway network was in 1893 in India. By that time almost every important city (and every important hill station) was connected by rail.

And below is the map of railway network in 2003.

2003_railway

Doesn’t look that dissimilar, does it?

The above map is from irfca (the Indian Railway Fan Club) site. Check them out.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...